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Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s If you’re looking for a starter long range rifle that is high quality, Bergara must be part of the conversation. In fact, they are often the entire subject . Made in Spain, Bergara is well known for having some of the best factory barrels ever made.

[Review] Bergara B-14 HMR: Best Factory Barrels?

[Review] Bergara B-14 HMR: Best Factory Barrels?Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s If you’re looking for a starter long range rifle that is high quality, Bergara must be part of the conversation. In fact, they are often the entire subject . Made in Spain, Bergara is well known for having some of the best factory barrels ever made. And since the action is built on the Remington 700 design, whats not to love about it! Bergara B-14 HMR and Athlon Ares BTR 4.5-27×50 Gen 2 Can to live up to the hype? What exactly is it good for? BPI was kind enough to send me a Bergara B-14 HMR in 6.5 Creedmoor so I could find out. Table of Contents Loading... Bergara Who? If you’re in the long range shooting community, you probably already know who Bergara is. But for the rest of the class — let’s introduce them. There are certain regions in the world were firearms manufacturing has a long and powerful history. And by long I mean in some cases hundreds of years. Basque of Northern Spain is one such area. Home of legendary historical firearm companies like Star and Astra, it is also home to Bergara. Both the town and the company. Bilbao the largest city in Basque, Spain The B-14 line of rifles are all made in Bergara, Spain while the Premier line is made in the USA. Bergara B-14 HMR 900 at GunPrime Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 900 at GunPrime Compare prices (3 found) GunPrime (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Features Broken Down From top to bottom the B-14 HMR is really well thought out. It is very clear that the design team behind this rifle are true shooters themselves and packed basically every feature you could ask for in a single factory rifle. Let’s go back to front on this. Buttstock and Cheek Rest The butt pad itself is very soft and does a great job of eating recoil. Overall length of pull is adjustable with spacers, simply back out the screws, remove the spacers, and tighten the screws back down. (top) Bergara B-14 HMR and (bottom) CVA Cascade This cheek rest is very nice, large, wide, and uses a screw knob for quick adjustment Pistol Grip I would like the checkering to be slightly more aggressive, but I found that it was good enough as is. Having a nearly vertical shape to the grip gives a great platform for consistent trigger pulls. Trigger This is one amazing trigger. Mine came set at about 2.75 pounds, is ultra crisp, and is just amazing. I really enjoy using it and would put it on par with most upgraded aftermarket triggers. Bolt/Bolt Handle Since this is based on the Remington 700, we find a 2-lug 90-degree throw bolt. It works, it works well, and it is smooth to cycle. It fed every type of ammo I could throw in it and did so flawlessly. I really like this bolt handle, it’s large and grippy. Perfect for my tastes. Magazine Something I really love seeing–a standard pattern magazine! The B-14 HMR takes AICS magazines and comes from the factory with a 5-round Bergara branded mag. Mmmm, magazines I tried MDT steel mags, MDT polymer mags, and Magpul polymer mags–all of them worked perfectly. This is a true AICS pattern mag well. Magpul AICS Short Action .308 Win/6.5 Creedmoor Magazine 38 at GunMagWarehouse Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 38 at GunMagWarehouse Prices accurate at time of writing Mini-Chassis Designed for repeatable bedding and accuresy, the Bergara stock also features a mini-chassis designed into it. Very nice. Barrel The crown jewel of the B-14 HMR–this barrel is nice in every possible way. The finish is great, it’s free-floated in the stock, it comes threaded with 5/8-24″ threading, and even features a metal thread protector. Bergara B-14 HMR threaded barrel Sling Studs and QD Caps Flexing the “hunting” part of HMR the stock has 3-sling swivels (1 in the back, 2 in the front) and 2 QD cup mounts. This gives you a lot of options for slings and bipods. I did most of my shooting with a Harris bipod on the front sling swivel. Range Report I’ve wanted to get a chance at shooting a B-14 HMR for a while now and when the chance finally came along, I wanted glass that would live up to the rifle’s potential. In the past I’ve been using an Athlon Ares BTR Gen 1, but Athlon recently released the second generation of the Ares BTR line and it seemed perfect for what the B-14 is designed for. Thankfully, Athlon was kind enough to send one out for testing. Bergara B-14 HMR The results have been outstanding. Off a bipod, off a bag, prone on the ground, this rifle shoots outstandingly well. Every cycle of the bolt was smooth and easy, every ammo tested extracted cleanly, everything just worked from start to finish. Small Groups Only Armed with two sets of plinking ammo and two sets of match ammo, I braved the hellscape of California’s deserts. And because I love shooting, I did it multiple times. In all, I’ve put about 250 rounds through the B-14 HMR, while not a huge round count–that is a decent amount of time behind a long-range precision rifle to get to know it. Bergara B-14 HMR side view I really don’t have anything negative to say about it. This is simply a great rifle. Let’s check the groups, we’ll go from big to small. Hornady American Gunner 140gr This was the largest grouping ammo, but that isn’t too surprising. Normally I get better results than this, but this isn’t bad at all considering this is the more plinking style of ammo from Hornady . Bergara B-14 HMR shooting "Hornady American Gunner" 1.82 MOA Still, pushing it to 600 yards was no problem and resulted in hits all day. If you exclude the flyer on this group, it was sub-MOA. But I tended to get a flyer every time I shot groups with this ammo, so I think it’s just the ammo. Hornady American Gunner 140gr 6.5 Creedmoor 58 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 58 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing Sellier & Bellot 140gr Generally, I don’t like S&B 6.5 Creedmoor . Out of five 6.5 Creedmoor rifles I own, S&B has extraction problems in all of them. Bolt rifles and gas rifles. But… I bought a ton of it on sale and I’m still shooting it. This Bergara was the first rifle that I didn’t have issues shooting this ammo. Not even a slight sticking, each and every round extracted with ease! And the groups weren’t bad either, for plinking ammo. Bergara B-14 HMR S&B 1.66 MOA Sig Sauer Elite Match 140gr I’ve always had great results with Sig Sauer ammo , I really think they are one of the most underrated factory ammo brands on the market. This is arguably the best group I shot with the Bergara and I was very happy with it. Sub-3/4 MOA is a great group! Bergara B-14 HMR Sig Sauer Match 0.71 MOA I also pushed this ammo out to the 600 yard target with zero problems. Perfect hits every time. Sig Sauer "Elite Match 140gr" 6.5 Creedmoor 24 at Primary Arms Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 24 at Primary Arms Prices accurate at time of writing Hornady ELD Match 140gr I count this as the best ammo, it was consistently under 0.75 MOA But when I shot this group, I threw one. Totally my fault–so I removed it from the group measurement. Bergara B-14 HMR Hornady ELD Match 0.67 MOA And again, pushing the ELD Match to 600 yards was a piece of cake. This rifle can shoot, period. Range day after range day, I really enjoy shooting this rifle. The features, the groups, it’s just great on every level. Hornady ELD Match 140gr 6.5 Creedmoor 30 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 30 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing Athlon Ares BTR 4.5-27×50 Gen 2 I won’t keep you in suspense, I love this optic. The Gen 1 was good, for what I paid for it, but the Gen 2 blows it out of the water in every way. In fact, it blows most of the competition in this price range away. Athlon Ares BTR Gen 2 Construction is great, everything is clean and works well. What really gets me are the turrets and the reticle. Oh, and the glass. First these turrets, they are just so crisp. So snappy. They are awesome. The zero stop works great and is a nice hard stop but also easy to set, combined with how positive and loud the clicks are–it beats out anything sub-$2,000 I’ve tried. Glass quality and light transition are outstanding. Although, it’s not a huge upgrade over the Gen 1. To my eyes, the Gen 2 is brighter–but only a little. This speaks to the glass quality that was already found in the Gen 1. Athlon Ares Gen 2 at 4.5x Finally the reticle, I’m really picky when it comes to reticles. Athlon has a huge range of reticles they use and offer the Ares gen 2 in both the APRS5 and APLR3. Mine is with the APLR3. Athlon Ares Gen 1 at 27x To me it isn’t the perfect reticle, if I could choose again I think I would opt for the APRS5 since it is very close to the APRS1 in my Athlon Cronus. That said, the APLR3 is still a great reticle. Athlon Ares BTR 4.5-27x50 Gen 2 918 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 918 at Amazon Compare prices (2 found) Amazon (See Price) OpticsPlanet (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing It’s clean, easy to use, and while the middle cross kind of feels a little large, it makes it easy and fast to pick up. Really, it’s more about what you prefer in a reticle. I still like the APRS1 found in the Athlon Cronus better, but the APLR3 is a very close runner-up. Athlon Cronus BTR APRS1 Reticle at 29x Something Extra If you’re looking at the pictures and thinking “what on earth is that strange orange thing”, the answer is that it is a Flare Mini . Flare Mini from Caveman It’s a simple little thing, a ring of special polymer that changes color when it’s over 131 degrees. While not the most critical piece of kit, I’ve been using the ones Caveman sent us for a couple of reasons. First, so when I’m packing up I don’t burn my bags. But mostly as a visual reminder to let my barrel cool off when I’m shooting groups. Especially when I’m testing stacks of ammo looking for what shoots well! Flare Minis come in a few colors, personally I like the green best. But orange is their classic. Flare Mini 12 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 12 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing Who Is It For? The name of the rifle is the B-14 HMR. I don’t know what the B-14 means, but the HMR is for Hunting and Match Rifle. From the ground up and even in the name the HMR is designed to fill two main roles–shooting paper targets and hunting. For the paper targets side, I love it. But it has some draw backs if you’re planing on hunting with it. It will shoot, we know that for sure. So ethical kills should be very easy to get in the bag. The weight though… coming in at just under 10 pounds, this isn’t a mountain rifle–but it isn’t a beast either. If you’re shooting from a blind or don’t plan on stalking far, then this is a great rifle. But I still see it better in a more match role. Granted, that comes from someone in the Western US where hiking up/down, in/out of canyons is standard for any kind of game. Speaking of matches, how does it compare? Head to any local PRS match and you’re almost always going to see at least one B-14 HMR there. And for good reason, it works. The stock is great and allows for the use of slings and bipods, plus the action is wonderful and the barrels accurate. Throw a muzzle brake on the threads and tracking shots is no problem. But I really recommend a brake, it helps a lot. I threw on a VG6 6.5 Gamma. VG6 6.5 Gamma 72 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 72 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing If you’re a range or match shooter that wants the option of hunting, I would highly recommend the B-14 HMR. If you’re a hunter that wants to plink or run a match sometimes, you should think about the weight before committing. As for the Athlon Ares BTR–I love it. I recommend it very strongly for the range or matches, but it’s a little heavy and overkill for hunting. That said, it’s still good to go! By The Numbers Reliability: 5/5 Perfect function. Even with ammo that I’ve had extraction issues with in other rifles, nothing stuck or bound in the slightest with the B-14 HMR. Ergonomics: 5/5 Generally, I prefer a true chassis over a stock, but this one is actually really well executed. The pistol grip is nearly vertical, the cheek rest fits my face nicely, and the forend is flat for resting on a bag. (front) Bergara B-14 HMR in 6.5 Creedmoor (back) Bergara B-14r in .22LR And of course, it has a mini-chassis built in for all of the benefits that brings. Accuracy: 5/5 This rifle shoots, period. I am very happy with the groups I was able to produce with a wide range of ammo options. Customization: 4/5 Being based on a Remington 700 action you have a LOT of choices in stocks, chassis, scope mounts, triggers, and more. But the B-14 stops short of being a Remington 700 clone by using proprietary barrels. You can get new barrels from Bergara, but that leaves you limited to their offerings. Value: 5/5 If you’re going to really use this rifle as a platform to learn long range shooting then it is an amazing value. If this is just a weekend plinker, you might not get as much out of it. Outside of a custom action rifle, I think this is the absolute best Remington 700 footprint rifle on the market currently. Bergara B-14 HMR 900 at GunPrime Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 900 at GunPrime Compare prices (3 found) GunPrime (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Overall: 5/5 Conclusion The Bergara B-14 HMR is a strong contender for the best value long range shooting platform. Based on the Remington 700 action you get your pick of almost any accessory but its Bergara’s barrels that really bring the HMR to a whole other level. I really had high hopes for the B-14 HMR and I’m happy to say that it didn’t disappoint even a little. It really lives up to the hype. If you’re not ready to spring for a custom-built rifle, but still want the best of the factory options–this is the rifle you’re looking for. From PRS to hunting, it will get the job done. What are your favorite bolt rifles? think there is something better on the market than the B-14 HMR? Let us know in the comments! For a lot more in long range optics, take a look at the Best Long Range Scopes & Optics ! Oh yes…we love optics!

Difference Between Gun Magazine vs Clip: Dont Be a Noob

Difference Between Gun Magazine vs Clip: Dont Be a Noob

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s One of the most often misused terms are gun magazines versus clips.  It boils down to what feeds what. Magazine vs Clip A magazine feeds the gun , while a clip feeds the magazine . Gun Magazine vs Clip, Firewoodhoardersclub Clips make loading multiple rounds into a magazine easier.  And sometimes you have to use the clip for a gun to work.  One example is the “en bloc” clip above for the older M1 Garand, where you leave in the clip.  It gives it the characteristic “ting” that you might have seen in movies such as Saving Private Ryan. While for some other old school guns such as the Mosin Nagant, you can use a stripper clip to feed the internal magazine. Loading Mosin Nagant with a Stripper Clip For regular modern guns with removeable magazines, there are still stripper clips and some fancier alternatives like the StripLULA for AR magazines. Stripper Clip Feeding a Magazine Here’s a great video from Hickok45 which shows you a ton of different examples. Who Really Cares? Personally, I believe everyone knows what you’re talking about if you confuse one with the other.  But there’s still plenty of people out there (especially online) that will try to bite your head off if you say it wrong.  What’s your opinion? Batman Clip vs Magazine

Best Mossberg 500 Side Saddles 2020 Overview

Best Mossberg 500 Side Saddles  2020 Overview

Finding the best Mossberg 500 side saddle can be a challenge. But if you know exactly what to look for, the search process will be a little easier for you. A good side saddle reliably allows you to store extra Mossberg shells while you’re out in the field or out on the range. Fortunately, we’ve handpicked five of the best side saddles for a Mossberg 500 that are currently on the market. One of these will probably be yours if one or two unique features stand out enough to get your attention. If you don’t know what a side saddle is, you’re not alone. Before we dig into the list of best side saddles, let’s talk about what a side saddle is and its purpose. We’ll also talk about the few aspects that you need to consider prior to purchasing a side saddle of your own. At a Glance: Our Top Picks for Mossberg 500 Side Saddles OUR TOP PICK: Lyman - Side Saddle Shell Holder Mesa Tactical SureShell Side Mount Shell Carrier BEST BUDGET OPTION: NcSTAR Universal 12ga Shots TacStar Hunter's SideSaddle ATI Shotshell Holder Comparison of the Best Mossberg "500 Side Saddle" s IMAGE PRODUCT Our Top Pick Lyman - "Side Saddle Shell" Holder Nylon molded design. Available in a 4-count or 6-count. Aluminum mounting plate that you can attach to your shotgun receiver. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Mesa Tactical SureShell "Side Mount Shell" Carrier Best budget Mossberg 500 side saddle. Available in 4-count, 6-count, or 8-count. Machined from high-quality aluminum for durability. "View Latest Price" → "Read Customer Reviews" Best Budget Option NcSTAR "Universal 12ga Shots" Very lightweight. Comes in a 6-count capacity. Made from durable material. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews TacStar Hunter's SideSaddle 4-count side saddle. Available in 12 gauge or 20 gauge. Constructed from polymer, making it indestructible and resistant to corrosion. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews ATI Shotshell Holder Holds up to 5 shells. Constructed from high-quality polymer. Mounting hardware for easier installation. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews What is a Side Saddle and What Is It Used For? Side saddles are used to store extra shotgun shells and are designed to stay attached to the side of your shotgun. This is a handy accessory to have when you want to keep extra shotgun rounds on you while you’re out in the field or out on the range. Source In a home defense situation where multiple attackers are present, having extra shells handy can be a huge difference maker. These side saddles are often installed on the buttstock of your shotgun . Also, you can install some of these on your shotgun receiver. This will allow for easy access and fast reloading, which is definitely a plus for most applications. How to Choose a Side Saddle There are some features and aspects that you need to consider prior to choosing a side saddle. You need to know which one will be a more reliable side saddle compared to those that are considered cheap and low quality. To get a better idea of how to choose a side saddle that best fits you, it’s important to know what drove past buyers to choose theirs. Here are a few things that they would want you to keep an eye out for while buying a side saddle of your own: Intent and Purpose What is your Mossberg 500 shotgun used for? Are you a hunter? Is it for home defense? Are you a competitive shooter? No matter what your intended purpose is, you need to make sure that you’re prepared with extra shells when the situation arises that you need them. Capacity While your side saddle is designed to give you fast reloading and less time trying to find extra shells, knowing how many you can carry is key. This is based on your personal needs and preferences. There are some side saddles that will hold up to 4 rounds, while others will hold up to 6 or more. Once again, this will depend on your intended purpose. If you’re out in the field for a hunt, it’s best to carry one with a capacity of 4. You can get away with 6 if you like. If you’re in a competition, then finding one with a larger capacity will be essential. Installation Of course, the ease of installation is important when it comes to side saddles. One of the ways to install a side saddle is by screwing them on the receiver of your shotgun. There are even some side saddles that you can install on your buttstock. These are typically the Velcro type side saddles that you can easily stick to either the stock or if you choose, the receiver. Either way, they’re both easy to install without having to rely on the services of a professional gunsmith. Quick Take - The Best Mossberg 500 Side Saddle These are our recommendations for the best Mossberg 500 side saddle: Lyman - Side Saddle Shell Holder Mesa Tactical SureShell Side Mount Shell Carrier NcSTAR Universal 12ga Shots Review of the Best Mossberg 500 Side Saddle Below are five of the best Mossberg 500 side saddles that are currently on the market. We chose each of these based on a characteristic or brand name. Others we have selected for the sake of those on a budget. No matter what your situation is financially, or if the brand name isn't much of an issue, there will probably be a side saddle that will best fit your Mossberg 500. Best Overall: ​ Lyman - Side Saddle Shell Holder CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Easy to install. Shells stay snug and secure. Excellent for law enforcement officers. Cons May not work with some Mossberg forends. Some users say that it’s rendered useless for left-handed shooters. You need to be careful when to tighten the screws. If you overtighten them in the slightest, they’ll strip the base plate. Our first pick for best overall side saddle currently on the market is the Lyman Side Saddle Shell Holder. A side saddle should be lightweight so it won’t add any unnecessary weight to your shotgun; thankfully, this side saddle is light in weight. It is designed to give you easy access and fast reloading, no matter the application. This nylon molded saddle has a mounting plate that is made from aluminum, which is designed to attach to your receiver using the screw holes. If you’re worried about making any kind of alterations to your Mossberg 500, you don’t have to worry; if you’re going to install this side saddle on your shotgun, you don’t have to make any additional modification. This side saddle is available in two counts: one that will hold up to four shells and one that will hold up to six shells. Choose the capacity that is best for you and you will have a reliable side saddle for your Mossberg 500. Bottom Line The "Lyman Side Saddle" Shell Holder has proven itself as worthy of the Best Overall title. While it is designed mostly for law enforcement use, it can also be used by the everyday Mossberg owner. More specifically, if you're using your Mossberg for home defense purposes, this is probably the side saddle you'll want. Whether you want a 4-count or a 6-count, you'll be satisfied with this. If you want a side saddle that will give you fast reloading and the ability to get as many shots off as possible, the Lyman Side Saddle should be a strong contender. Best For The Money: ​ Mesa Tactical SureShell Side Mount Shell Carrier CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Easy to install. Slim and lightweight. Holds shells securely. Cons Some have complained about the screws not being secure enough. Some have said that the screws and washers are a little smaller than they’re supposed to be. If you're on a budget, you know for sure that we've handpicked an excellent side saddle for you. We've bestowed the honor of "Best For The Money" to the Mesa Tactical SureShell Side Mount Shell Carrier. This carrier is also available in 4-count, 6-count, and 8-count. The top of this side saddle has that ribbed look (which looks like some kind of Picatinny rail ). It is definitely something that you want to install on your receiver . Speaking of installation, this is easy to install on your Mossberg 500 without ever having to rely on a professional gunsmith. If you have no gunsmithing skills whatsoever, you can breathe a sigh of relief. This side saddle is machined from high-quality aluminum, which can reliably handle the amount of shock that is produced from recoil. The finish is a matte black finish that will blend in with your shotgun without making it look like an aesthetic disaster. So if looks matter to your Mossberg, then you won’t have to worry about this making it look ugly. Overall, this is a side saddle that is more than what you’d expect from a run-of-the-mill kind of budget side saddle. If you’re looking for something that will give you more than what you’ll pay for, the Mesa Tactical SureShell might be your best choice. Bottom Line If you’re on a budget, the Mesa Side Saddle might just be the one you want for your shotgun. Even if you have money to play with, you should give this a deeper look. One of the main reasons is obviously the variation of counts that it comes in. If you need more rounds, there’s a side saddle for you. Once again, this will depend on the application. Whether it’s for hunting, competition, or home defense, the "Mesa Side Saddle" will not let you down and will never leave you hanging when you need an extra shot or two. Best Velcro Side Saddle: NcSTAR Universal 12ga Shots CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Velcro holds very strong. Shells are held snug and secure. Shells will not fall out because of recoil. Cons Some say that the Velcro is a little oversized. Some users have reported that some holders may be a little tighter than the others. Aside from the holders being a little too tight, some of the holders may be a little too loose. Sometimes, a good side saddle doesn't have to be attached with screws. With that said, we present to you the best velcro side saddle on the market. This is the NcStar Universal side saddle, designed to hold your favorite 12 gauge shotgun shells. This is a six-count side saddle that you can install on your receiver, making it one of the easiest, most accessible side saddles on the market. All you need to do is reach for a shotgun shell, load it up, and take your shot. From there, it's rinse and repeat. If you’re looking for a side saddle and not impressed with the idea of having to install one with the use of screws and tools, then the NcStar side saddle might be exactly what you need. Get one or two of these for your Mossberg 500 and even another shotgun of your choice. These will fit most 12 gauge shotgun rounds, so you won’t have to worry about whether or not the shells you use will fit or not. Bottom Line For its part, the NcSTAR side saddle does a pretty good job of holding your shotgun shells together. Since it's velcro, this will likely give all the other side saddles (Velcro or otherwise) a run for their money. For the most part, this has the ability to keep the shells snug and secure, especially when you're firing off multiple rounds with your Mossberg 500. If you hate the idea of using screws and want a side saddle that is easy to slap on and be good to go, then the NcSTAR might be the side saddle that's best for you. Best From TacStar: ​ TacStar Hunter's SideSaddle CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Able to give you quick access to ammo. Still lightweight, even if you are carrying extra rounds. Fits perfectly, regardless of whether you have a 12 gauge or 20 gauge shotgun. Cons Some are not happy with the screws being hard to cap. One reviewer says that the screws should be longer and more secure. If you're a fan of the TacStar brand, we have the best side saddle directly from them. More specifically, we have the Hunter's Sidesaddle. This comes in a 4-count holder, which is ideally designed for the bird hunter or the big game hunter. You can install this on your Mossberg 500 without ever having to make any modifications to your shotgun. It has an aluminum backplate that is rugged, durable, and will be able to handle the recoil of your shotgun . The best thing about this side saddle is not only is it available for 12 gauge Mossbergs but 20 gauge Mossbergs as well. This also comes in two colors: Realtree Advantage and hunter black. Whether camo is your thing or not, this is a reliable side saddle to have when you’re out in the field and ready to knock down that big game target you’ve been after all season long. Bottom Line For a side saddle, this one is as tough as it gets. The polymer construction really does make it impervious to damage, which really impresses us. Not only that, this is probably going to be your best hunting buddy if you decide to go with this side saddle. So if you use a Mossberg 500 for the purpose of hunting big game or bird hunting and need a universal fit side saddle, the TacStar will probably be the side saddle worth investing in. Best From ATI: ​ ATI Shotshell Holder CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Works perfectly with ATI brand stocks. Super durable thanks to the high-quality polymer. Screw holes line up perfectly with most Mossberg 500 shotguns. Cons Some have complained about this being poorly built. Some have complained about this being a little flimsy. One reviewer said that this won’t work well with collapsible stocks. Finally, we’ll be taking a look at the best from the ATI brand. The shotshell holder has the ability to hold up to 5 12 gauge shotgun shells. This side saddle is also one tough customer because of the material it’s constructed from. While it is polymer, it is not your average type of polymer. This is Extreme Temperature Glass Reinforced Polymer developed by DuPont. Yes, that’s the same DuPont that develops kevlar for bulletproof vests. Most important, this is an easy to install side saddle. No need for fancy tools or gunsmithing skills. This is an ideal side saddle for the purpose of hunting, though you can certainly use this for just about any other application you want. Bottom Line This side saddle and the TacStar will possibly duke it out in the not so distant future when it comes to side saddles. I won’t be surprised if there’s a great debate about these two at some point down the road. But for now, if you want a side saddle that is super durable and you fancy yourself a fan of the ATI brand, then this might be the side saddle that fits your Mossberg 500 perfectly. How to Install a Side Saddle on Your Shotgun Sure, it’s easy to install a side saddle on your shotgun. But you may not have any installation instructions that will come with the side saddle that you choose. So, we’ve taken the liberty of providing you with side saddle instructions of your own. Keep in mind that this will pretty much be the same instructions no matter which side saddle you choose (of course, if you chose a velcro side saddle, you may disregard this part). With that said, here’s how you install a side saddle on your shotgun: Before doing anything else, make sure that your shotgun is unloaded. Open the action and lay the shotgun down with the ejection port facing up. Remove the screw that is located inside the ejection port. You’ll need a screwdriver or a Leatherman. You will have a replacement screw that comes along with the side saddle you chose. Place the screw in the ejection port, screw it in. Pop out the pin located just near the trigger housing . You can pop it open using a long screw and tap it with the handle end of the screwdriver. The screw will pop out from the other side. Push in the replacement all the way. You should see the threads stick out. This is normal. Remove the washers located on the holes of the side saddle using an Allen wrench. What you’re doing here is separating the mounting plate from the shell compartments. Install the plate on your shotgun. Secure it properly using an Allen wrench. Add the nut and washer in the larger hole and tighten it until secure. Place the shell holders and tighten them until secure using an Allen wrench. Double check to see if the side saddle is snug and secure. How to Reload a Shotgun Using a Side Saddle Now here comes the fun part. There are two different techniques will show you on how you can reload a shotgun using a side saddle. This is ideal in a home defense or competition application. In order to reload a shotgun using your side saddle, you’ll need to follow these instructions for each technique. Let’s start with the first one: Technique #1 You need to make sure that the shells in your side saddle are placed brass side down. As you reload, make sure the stock is tucked below your armpit. Pull down a shell brass side down and quickly load it into the loading port. Push it into the magazine tube using your thumb. Technique #2 You can alternatively load the shell into the ejection port. You can do this without looking at the gun. This time, the brass part of your shells should be facing up. Blade your hand and point it toward you. As you’re doing this, push up the shell closest to you using your thumb. Feed the shell using the magazine tube. Alternatively, you can load it via the ejection port. Conclusion Finding the best Mossberg 500 side saddle is easy if you know what you’re looking for. If you need one with 4 shells or 8, having one handy in any application is always good to have. Especially when you want to reload and get a shot off fast. Remember, if a side saddle sticks out as one of your favorites, make sure you do more further research to ensure that you are making the right decision when it comes to choosing a great side saddle. Timing is everything when it comes to these things. So find one that will allow you easy access and will quicken your ability to reload your Mossberg 500.

Trijicon MRO Review: Best Value Red Dot

Trijicon MRO Review: Best Value Red Dot

AR15s are a capable, durable, and handy rifle… what you need to match it, is a very durable optic. Not to state the obvious, but when you buy an optic, the more you spend… the higher quality it is. For red dots, you will eventually be reaching a point of diminishing returns. I believe that the Trijicon MRO lands in a sweet spot, combining a budget friendly price with legendary Trijicon durability. How does it stack up? The MRO looks at home on a 10.5 AR pistol. (For those wondering why my front sight is in the middle of the rail, I took my flashlight off to zero the pistol.) Price comparison: The price of an Aimpoint t2 with a mount is around 850$. The price of a MRO with a basic mount is around 500$. And for me, I got it for $450 shipped from Big Daddy Unlimited, Midwest Industries QD Mount included. For that price difference you can get the MRO with a mount and 1000 rounds of ammo for the same price or less. The features of the MRO and the Aimpoint are similar and both optics are extremely durable. The Aimpoint is more proven at this time as the military has used them for years and the MRO is relatively new coming out about 5 or 6 years ago. However as time goes on, I think the MRO will be seen as just as good of an optic if not better than an Aimpoint. Let’s take a look at the features that make up the price differences. Features: Some of the features that make this optic so great are the 5 year battery life, 25mm objective lens, and its 7075-t6 aluminum body. The 5 year advertised battery life puts it right there with Aimpoint but with some caveats; setting 3 for the MRO v.s. setting 7 on the Aimpoint. Setting 3 is usable in not so bright conditions. For the MRO setting 4 would be the most applicable setting for most environments, so ultimately it isn’t as efficient as the Aimpoint, but I would be willing to bet you will still get 3 years out of one battery. Having the larger objective lens also gives you a wider field of view in theory. Since it’s a red dot you should have both eyes open while shooting, however; it’s still *nicer* to look through the MRO than a regular tube optic like an Aimpoint. Finally, the MRO is a forged 7075 t6 body and is what makes this such a durable optic. Top down view of the MRO, the recessed turrets have not moved even though I can easily adjust them with a fingernail. The dot is only blurry due to the camera. It is very crisp to the human eye. Durability: When I tested this optic for its durability, I didn’t go crazy with beating it up, but I wanted it to be realistic for what I might experience. I have previously zeroed the MRO at 36 yards. To start the test, I started before we even drive to the shooting spot. I tossed the rifle in the back of the truck bed. I then tossed my AK on top of it. It’s a nice bumpy ride to my shooting spot so the rifles were bouncing around and on top of each other while smacking the truck bed. I then confirmed the zero at my 200 yard target. It was dead on. I then dropped it once on each side of the optic, once directly on top. It didn’t miss a beat. For me, that is more than acceptable! Closer to what the dot actually looks like, it’s a very crisp dot!! Pictures don’t do it justice. Why Trijicon? Trijicon has developed its legendary reputation of durability from its ACOG optic. The ACOG as we know is a combat proven, highly effective optic that gives our troops a great advantage over anyone we face. There is a reason the military uses ACOG’s.  It’s because they’re darn near indestructible, and the MRO is made from the same company, using the same materials, and the same quality control. Again 7075 T6 aluminum is what makes this optic housing extremely strong. So there should be no doubt that the MRO is as durable of an optic as its older brother the ACOG. The MRO is also made in America, which is a huge addition for me compared to its Aimpoint counterparts which are made in Sweden. That’s not a bad thing for Aimpoint, but ‘Murica nuff said. Almost all Trijicon products are made in America with a few exceptions which is great by today’s standards. The MRO just looks good. Being left-handed, having the illumination adjustment on top is a nice feature Personal Testimony: The Trijicon MRO is a very robust optic and I have no doubt it will be one of the most reliable optics anyone can buy. As for the quality to price ratio, the value is extremely high on this optic. You are getting a micro dot size package that competes directly with the Aimpoint micro series of red dots. You get a 5 year battery life, very crisp dot, an interesting optic design that grows on you and is left or right hand friendly (the illumination dial is on top vs right hand side). If you have read articles where they say that the MRO has some magnification, they’re true. However you have to look for it. What I mean by that is while you are shooting, you really won’t notice it, but if you are specifically looking for the magnification you will see it. It also has a slight blue tint but it doesn’t really bother me. Again, while I was shooting and focusing on everything else, it was barely noticeable. If you have the chance to get this optic, do it. I will recommend this over all optics in the budget price range (holosun, primary arms, vortex) but they do have their place. But for people who want a serious optic, save your money and get the MRO. For anyone wanting a micro red dot that you can bet your life on, save your money for the MRO. I will take an MRO over a budget red dot or even an Aimpoint micro for the price. MRO and Midwest Industries quick detach mount from "Big Daddy Unlimited" for $450 shipped and tax. The MRO is sitting on a PSA Upper which has been functioning great! Review to come. This Optic was purchased with cash money and Trijicon has no financial ties to www.thenewrifleman.com. See more on the Trijicon MRO at Trijicon’s website Here. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

How to Shoot Long-Range: Best Tips for Beginners

One of the most challenging feats as a hunter is shooting long range distances, especially for beginner users of the hunting rifle. However, that doesn’t mean you cannot perfect the art of shooting long range, which will improve your hunting reaps in the long run. Thus, in this article, I’m going to share some tips on how to shoot long range. — Joseph Gleason of captainhunter.com . Know your rifle Like any other gun, you need to be its master before you it can service you well. If you want to master the difficult task of shooting long range, treat your rifle like a third arm. Take care of it, practice with it as often as you can, practice assembling it, and learn how to un-jam it if the need arises. Just like choosing the best IWB holster , you need to choose a hunting rifle that fits you best. After that, know your weapon well and treat it as your best friend both in and outside the field. Once you’ve got this step done, you’ll find that shooting long range will be easier with a rifle that you know better than anything else. Moreover, in mastering your rifle, you need to learn how to maintain a consistent shoulder pressure and trigger pull. Find a shoulder pressure that works and can bring you the most accurate shots. On the other hand, learning how to pull a trigger without disturbing the aim of the rifle is tricky at first. Of course, both consistent shoulder pressure and trigger pull can only be mastered through practice. Learn to shoot in winds More often than not, the wind is not going to cooperate with your shooting. In long distance shooting, the wind plays a big factor in your accuracy by influencing either the direction or trajectory of your shot. Therefore, you can learn to work with the wind by training in different conditions. While doing this, you should learn from each of your shots. What direction is the wind blowing? How windy is it? Answer these questions while you evaluate the accuracy of your shot. With enough practice, you’ll master long-range shooting with the wind as an external factor. Practice shooting from odd places That whitetail isn’t going to stay still and wait for you to shoot it. Thus, you also need to learn how to shoot from unusual places. In long-distance shooting, this skill will also serve as your advantage. When you can, practice shooting from behind a rock, a mound, or from a ditch. On the other hand, if you’re going to do a lot of prey stalking, practicing long-range shooting from behind bushes, rocks, or trees. Master the proper position and breathing Position and breathing are just as important as the other factors we mentioned beforehand. To be a great long-distance shooter, you need to master the correct position and breathing technique. To do that, practice shooting with your spine parallel to the stock of the rifle (while laying on your stomach), and with the butt of the gun resting on the well of your shoulder. Wrap your middle and ring finger around the stock and let your index finger reach to the trigger. Make sure your grip is light, or this will affect your shot and the follow-through. As for breathing, the most accurate shots will result from a shot taken at the tip of every exhale. In general, you should learn how to coordinate these two factors until you’ve mastered your own unique strategy. Take care of your rifle For a Glock 26, you’re going to buy the best Glock 26 holster to protect it. Maintenance and care of bigger guns is just the same. To keep your accuracy consistent, keep your gun clean with a regular cleaning session. However, a spotless gun won’t do you good either. Maintain a level of fouling that allows you to shoot the most accurate shots, and learn how to adjust the level of cleaning you have to do for each session. Learn how to use a scope In order to acquire the skill of scoping your target, buy a great scope and stick to it. Moreover, buy the kind of scope that works well for you. Once you’ve got the right scope, you can now practice zeroing in. Zeroing in will allow you to see your target at the same focal plane. Thus, giving you the best shot possible. This is a difficult skill to master, especially for beginners, but it is not impossible. Again, practice makes permanent; and understanding your scope is the first step to that. Adjust your diopeter Optimizing your focus is most important for accuracy in long-range shooting. To achieve this, focus your reticle using a plain background until it appears clear and crisp. Follow-through This refers to watching the bullet impact your target through the scope, which is important to make better shots. Seeing where your bullet hit (or where it didn’t) will allow you to calculate your next shot. Otherwise, you’ll end up guessing and probably making the same mistakes. To follow-through, squeeze the trigger back after the shot, then slowly release it back to the front without removing your sight from the scope. Call the shot. Re-calculate. Learn. Then move on. Keep a record To be a smart long-distance shooter, you can start logging your shots in a notebook or sheet. Record the condition, distance of the target, scope reading, and the result of your shot. This will let you learn from your own mistakes, and possibly identify some of your weaknesses. Assess the kickback As expert long-range shooters say, your shot is good if the gun kicks back directly towards you and the crosshairs fall back to the target after the shot. Therefore, you need to learn from the kickback of your rifle. Doing so will allow you to identify if your shot is “wrong” or not, and most likely improve your next one. Conclusion Shooting long-range distances is not an easy feat, especially for beginner hunters. However, learning how to do so will improve your chances of reaping rewards and also expand your options. There are many useful tips in this article on how to shoot long-range distances, but the most important one is: train smart; not hard. I hope you learned a lot from this article. If you enjoyed it, feel free to leave a comment below and tell us what you think. Don’t forget to share this with all your hunter friends, as well. Thanks for reading! by Kenn Blanchard This post first appeared on blackmanwithagun .com Consider subscribing their podcast https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/black-man-with-a-gun/id267726144

Springfields New Pistols: EMP, XD Mod.2 and 1911 TRP

Springfield is proud to announce and demonstrate at SHOT Show 2017 five new handguns including the XD® Mod.2® Tactical in .45 ACP, the XD® Mod.2® Service Model in .45 ACP, the EMP® Lightweight Champion™ with Concealed Carry Contour, the EMP® All Black, and the 1911 TRP™ Operator, Tactical Gray. “We’re committed to protecting Springfield Armory®’s storied legacy,” stated the company’s CEO, Dennis Reese. “The way we do that each and every day is to design and build the very best products we can to help our customers protect their legacies. It’s an incredible responsibility that drives us, and we’re very proud to bring these new products to market.” Springfield XD Mod 2 The XD® Mod.2® Tactical brings .45 ACP chambering to the five-inch barrel pistol launched in 2016. The new gun packs 13+1 rounds of big bore ammunition into a package more like that of a standard size 9mm pistol. The XD® Mod.2® Tactical features fiber-optic front sight, low-profile combat rear sight, and all of the ergonomic enhancements of the Mod.2® series including GripZone™ texturing and High-Hand™ beavertail and frame cuts. At home on the competition range or in the hands of law enforcement and legally armed citizens, the XD® Mod.2® Tactical brings controllable high capacity to large caliber pistols. Springfield XD Mod 2 Service Model The new XD® Mod.2® Service Model packs 13+1 rounds of .45 ACP into a slender double stack handgun. With its four-inch barrel and standard size frame, this one is great for a variety of applications including competition, recreation, home defense, and concealed carry. The Mod.2® ergonomics enhancements make this .45 ACP easy to control and a pleasure to shoot. The XD® Mod.2® Service Model has all the quality mechanics one expects: hammer-forged Carbon steel Melonite® barrel, forged steel Melonite® slide, fiber optic front and low profile rear sight, and a dual spring recoil system. All of that is packed into 7.3 inches of overall length and 5.75 inches of height. With its width of just 1.22 inches, it’s hard to believe it’s a double-stack .45. Springfield TRP in Tactical Grey For 1911 enthusiasts and serious large caliber shooters, the company is announcing the 1911 TRP™ Operator, Tactical Gray. The original TRP™ pistol was designed as a consumer-friendly alternative to high-end custom shop 1911s. Modeled after the FBI Contract pistol, the TRP™ redefines what a production gun can be. The TRP™ Operator, Tactical Gray includes a tasteful, and exceptionally durable gray Armory Kote™ frame finish mated with a forged steel black Armory Kote™ slide. The new model also includes an accessory rail for attachment of lights or lasers and an adjustable, low-profile rear sight. Springfield EMP The EMP® Lightweight Champion™ with "Concealed Carry Contour" brings a new, even easier to conceal member to the EMP® family. Having earned the reputation of the most elegant and shootable carry pistols, it only made sense to bring new carry-friendly versions to market. The mainspring housing is bevel cut to fit more comfortably in hand and conceal more easily by eliminating the telltale bulge caused by the grip base. Like the original EMP®, the new model features a hardcoat anodized frame matched with a brushed stainless steel slide. A fiber optic front sight, low-profile rear sight, and G10 grips round out the package. Springfield EMP All Blacjk The EMP® All Black proves that good looks can be discreet too. This 9mm pistol sports a three-inch barrel, black hardcoat anodized frame, and a black Armory Kote™ slide. Attractive and durable Cocobolo wood grips, fiber optic front sight, and low-profile combat rear sight complete the pistol. Each EMP® All Black ships with three 9-round steel magazines. All five new handguns will be displayed at the 2017 Shooting, Hunting, and Outdoors Trade (SHOT) Show the week of January 16, 2017, and are available for order immediately. About Springfield Armory® “The First Name in American Firearms,” Springfield Armory® was founded in 1777, when George Washington ordered the creation of an armory to store ammunition and gun carriages during the American Revolution. In 1794, the armory began to manufacture muskets and spent the next 150 years supplying firearms for every major American conflict. The original armory closed in 1968. In 1974, the Reese family took ownership of the Springfield Armory® name and began making the M1A™ rifle. Today, Springfield Armory® develops many products loyal to the company’s heritage, like the 1911 pistol, while ensuring its future with innovative products, including the XD®, XD® Mod.2®, XD(M)® and XD-S® polymer pistols and now the new SAINT™ AR-15 rifle.

Summary

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s If you’re looking for a starter long range rifle that is high quality, Bergara must be part of the conversation. In fact, they are often the entire subject . Made in Spain, Bergara is well known for having some of the best factory barrels ever made.